Blog 3: A Conclusive Review of my Research on the Characterization of Bee Products

March is a busy month in the world of Chemical research! I am currently preparing to attend the American Chemistry Society conference in Orlando, Florida, which will take place at the end of the month, along with the Dyson School Society of Fellows conference on March 9th. Although the plane tickets are booked and the conferences are registered for, the most important part remains in the works – the display poster. I aim to have the poster completed by Spring Break, as I am currently working on analyzing the major peaks on the gas chromatography-mass spectrometry chromatogram to understand which compounds can be found in the pollen.

Presenting at the Dyson Society of Fellow’s conference.

The extraction process for the solvents being used is now complete. I decided upon using four main solvents: ethanol, methanol, methylene chloride, and chloroform. Using a precision balance, I weighed 5 grams of pollen, specifically from Los Baños in the Philippines. Allowing the pollen to sit in a test tube with the solvent for about 24 hours results in a solution ready to be filtered. I used syringe filtration to filter each of the solutions. The filtered products were then put into mini centrifuge tubes and refrigerated for another 24 hours. Post-refrigeration, the filtered solutions were ready to be injected into the GC-MS. One sample was injected per day, using different injection needles as to avoid any cross-contaminations between the solvents.

Samples of bee pollen in five various solvents.

Experiments do not always go as planned. Through this experiment, I have learned to not only accept this, but embrace it as a learning opportunity. Whenever something does not go as planned, I work collaboratively with my faculty mentor to ask the questions “why did this go wrong?” and “how can we fix it?” One recent example of this was the possibility of contamination. Rather than rinsing out the injection needle and re-using them, the possibility of cross-contamination was eradicated by using multiple injection needles.

As the end of my research project comes near, I am focusing on an in-depth exploration and analysis of the results at hand. I am also currently working on a paper about my research in hopes of submitting it for publication. Overall, this research opportunity has provided me with investigative skills, critical thinking skills, while enhancing my wet lab skills as well.

Chromatographic Characterization of Bee Propolis and Pollen from Around the World

The title of my research, as stated above, is the Chromatographic Characterization of Bee Propolis and Pollen From Around the World. I have chosen to analyze and compare the components that make up bee pollen and propolis from several species with varying origins, developing an understanding for how the type of extraction methods will affect the gathered results. The purpose of this research is to distinguish between the results gathered from using different extraction methods, while understanding the importance of the extracted components. Moving forward, we would like to understand the different health benefits that propolis can provide for humans and which benefits relate to which chromatographically discovered components.

Before stepping into the wet lab and performing physical research, Dr. Elmer Mojica and I worked collaboratively to perform literary research in order to finalize my research question and methodology being used. We studied papers from several scientific journals, such as the Food Research International and the Journal of the Science of Food and Agriculture. In today’s society, the focus of what is being put inside the foods and products consumed by humans is so vast and significant. For this reason, I expect to achieve a fully developed understanding of which extraction method is best, along with which components are found in which species of bees. I can then use this to understand which components humans are consuming when they go to health food stores to purchase propolis and pollen.

The methodology being used to answer my research question varies depending on the extraction method being used. In chemistry, extraction methods are used to separate substances that they are mixed with. I used my literary research to fully understand the Soxhlet, microwave, sonication, accelerated solvent extraction, and simple extraction. I aim to compare these methods with one another. I will first be using dichloromethane and methanol to make solutions with the propolis and pollen. I can then inject these solutions into the machine known as GC-MS, or gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. This provides us with a visual representation of the spectrum. We can then use this, alongside a library, to analyze which molecules make up the propolis and pollen. Refer to Image 1.0 for footage of the first bee pollen that we have begun analyzing.

Image 1.0 – Stingless Bee Pollen from Los Baños, Leguna, Phillippines

This semester has so far been successful with literary research and we have begun injecting samples into the GC-MS. We are looking forward to analyzing the results and successfully reaching our desired achievements to answer my research question.