Blog Post #2: Continuation of Research on the Methods of Extracting Bee Pollen

During the entirety of the Fall semester, I worked collaboratively with Dr. Mojica for 1-2 lab sessions per week. We met before, during, and after my time in the lab to establish the goals for the lab session, answer any relevant questions, and discuss a brief overview of the results attained. Using my lab notebook, I kept track of each step taken in this process, as well as by taking photo documentation. Dr. Mojica and I also worked to establish an abstract to submit to the American Chemical Society for the 257th National Meeting, taking place in the Spring of 2019 in Orlando, Florida. I was happily accepted, alongside some of my colleagues, to be given the opportunity to present my research at the conference with some of my colleagues. Since my study focuses on various extraction methods, it has been very beneficial to work with Dr. Mojica who, through a collaborative effort, has taught me several methods of extraction for various bee-deriving substances. With a passion for the topic of analysis, the initiative to continue my research this semester was simply to find an answer to the question at hand in hopes of using the results to help better understand how bee substances can help our society.

Throughout this semester, my UGR research has taken a turn from focusing primarily on propolis to being inclusive of pollen, as well. A recurring obstacle was noticed despite of the change in focus from propolis to pollen. It appeared that cross-contamination in the GC-MS instrument remained a prevalent issue. For this reason, we came up with a few problem-solving techniques, such as running a trial solely with the solvent before running it with the pollen. This aided in cleaning out the machine of any by-products that may have been lingering from prior research. Additionally, our addition of a new machine, described below, has helped us in the extraction process in an effort to avoid cross-contamination. Each week, we have worked to make continuous progress on this project, despite of any obstacles encountered along the way.

Fortunately, we ended the semester with a gift from NSF, the National Science Foundation. The National Science Foundation, an American government agency, provides financial aid to support research and education in the field of science. Dr. Mojica was given a grant for the Accelerated Solvent Extraction (ASE) machine, which I have had the benefit to start using. The ASE machine is used for the extraction of chemicals from a solid. I first grind the bee pollen into smaller pieces and let these pieces sit in 5 mL of the given solvent overnight. Then, I manually filter this solution using syringe filters. This is followed by an extraction in the ASE machine. Below is a photo of me with our new ASE machine and my first extraction using the machine! We are continuing to answer the question of why there are outside chemicals showing up in our results from the GC-MS and hope to have this issue solved by the end of the semester.

 

My first extract of pollen and methanol using our new ASE.