Blog 3: A Conclusive Review of my Research on the Characterization of Bee Products

March is a busy month in the world of Chemical research! I am currently preparing to attend the American Chemistry Society conference in Orlando, Florida, which will take place at the end of the month, along with the Dyson School Society of Fellows conference on March 9th. Although the plane tickets are booked and the conferences are registered for, the most important part remains in the works – the display poster. I aim to have the poster completed by Spring Break, as I am currently working on analyzing the major peaks on the gas chromatography-mass spectrometry chromatogram to understand which compounds can be found in the pollen.

Presenting at the Dyson Society of Fellow’s conference.

The extraction process for the solvents being used is now complete. I decided upon using four main solvents: ethanol, methanol, methylene chloride, and chloroform. Using a precision balance, I weighed 5 grams of pollen, specifically from Los Baños in the Philippines. Allowing the pollen to sit in a test tube with the solvent for about 24 hours results in a solution ready to be filtered. I used syringe filtration to filter each of the solutions. The filtered products were then put into mini centrifuge tubes and refrigerated for another 24 hours. Post-refrigeration, the filtered solutions were ready to be injected into the GC-MS. One sample was injected per day, using different injection needles as to avoid any cross-contaminations between the solvents.

Samples of bee pollen in five various solvents.

Experiments do not always go as planned. Through this experiment, I have learned to not only accept this, but embrace it as a learning opportunity. Whenever something does not go as planned, I work collaboratively with my faculty mentor to ask the questions “why did this go wrong?” and “how can we fix it?” One recent example of this was the possibility of contamination. Rather than rinsing out the injection needle and re-using them, the possibility of cross-contamination was eradicated by using multiple injection needles.

As the end of my research project comes near, I am focusing on an in-depth exploration and analysis of the results at hand. I am also currently working on a paper about my research in hopes of submitting it for publication. Overall, this research opportunity has provided me with investigative skills, critical thinking skills, while enhancing my wet lab skills as well.